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The best photo scanners in 2022

One of the best photo scanners on a worktop beside a laptop and a selection of photos
(Image credit: Epson)

One of the best photo scanners can be a great investment if you have a big library of printed photos that you want to back up digitally. Digitalising old photos can allow you to preserve the images for the future, safe from ageing and the risk of accidents. That applies equally to those with dusty old photo albums to anyone rediscovering the joys of old SLR cameras and taking new analogue shots today.

Scanning your images with one of the best photo scanners also allows you to share your images with others, be it by email, a website or on social media. There are a lot of options out there, from general all-purpose scanners that can do the job to specialist photo scanners for professionals. Which option is best for you will depend on how many photos and what kind of photos you're going to want to scan and the level of quality you're expecting.

In the guide below, we've picked the best photo scanners for different requirements. We've selected devices from a range of manufacturers, including big names like Epson and Canon, and we've evaluated each one based on its specs, such as resolution, scan speed and physical size. We've also considered value for money, making sure to include options for different budgets (see how we test and review for more details of our review process). If you have doubts about which type of scanner you need, check the frequent questions at the bottom of the page.

If you're also planning to print reproductions from your scans, see our guide to the best home printers and the best printers for photos. Also, if you're scanning documents to sign, see our guide to the best e-signature software.

The best photo scanners

A product shot of Epson Perfection V600, one of the best photo scannersCB

(Image credit: Epson)

01. Epson Perfection V600

The best photo scanner overall

Specifications

Scan resolution: 6400dpi
Interface: USB
Size: 48.5 x 28 x 11.8cm
Weight: 4kg

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent resolution
+
Perfect for film and prints
+
Automatically restores photos

Reasons to avoid

-
Big and bulky

We think the Epson Perfection V600 is the best photo scanner overall for the majority of people. This flatbed scanner can scan both film negatives and printed photographs with a resolution of up to 6,400dpi. It's reasonably priced, it comes from a trusted brand and it boasts a range of handy extra features, so we think it's pretty much a no-brainer unless you have very specific needs.

We found the built-in digital correction and enhancement technology to be a good timesaver. Depending on what you're going to use the images for, you might still want to edit them best photo editing software but these features save a lot of time by removing blemishes such as scratches, dust motes and spots – a real blessing if you're batch-scanning lots of old photos. 

The two film holders that come with the Perfection V600 can be adapted to different sizes and formats, including 35mm negatives and mounted slide transparencies. The only downside we can find with the Perfection V600 is that it's a little on the large side for a scanner – it's not something that's easy to hide away in a corner or in a drawer. Other than that, we think it really is the near-perfect solution for most people looking for the best photo scanner.

Product shot of Plustek ePhoto Z300, one of the best photo scannersCB endorsed

(Image credit: Plustek)

02. Plustek ePhoto Z300

The best affordable photo scanner

Specifications

Scan resolution: 600dpi
Interface: USB
Size: 28.96 x 16 x 15.75cm
Weight: 1.48kg

Reasons to buy

+
Simple and straightforward
+
Good price
+
Built-in-enhancement tools

Reasons to avoid

-
Basic and slow

The Epson Perfection V600 is good value but it certainly isn't the cheapest photo scanner. If you're looking for something more economical, the Plustek ePhoto Z300 is a good option for those on budget. With a scanning resolution of just 600dpi, this scanner clearly won't produce images as detailed as those digitised by the Epson scanner above. But if you don't need luxuriously large files and just want something to turn physical images into digital format, we think the Plustek ePhoto Z300 is a good bet. Not least because it costs about a third of the price. 

The Plustek ePhoto Z300 is also quite compact for a scanner, which makes it easier to store if you have minimal space. It does have other limitations, though, beyond the resolution. You can't batch-scan photos – instead, you have to feed them through one at a time. That makes for a time-consuming process if you need to scan a lot of images, so if you have a big archive that needs digitising, it may be worth shelling out a little more cash for a more efficient scanner. Otherwise, the Plustek ePhoto Z300 is an easy-to-use option that's perfect for budget scanning.

A product shot of Epson FastFoto FF-680W, one of the best photo scannersCB endorsed

(Image credit: Epson)

03. Epson FastFoto FF-680W

The fastest photo scanner

Specifications

Scan resolution: 300 or 600dpi
Interface: USB, Wi-Fi
Size: 17 x 30 x 17.5cm
Weight: 3.7kg

Reasons to buy

+
Incredibly quick
+
Great for batch scanning

Reasons to avoid

-
Short on features
-
Not cheap

Anyone who has scanned a lot of photos will know that, to be frank, it's a hugely tedious task. If you have a lot of photos and want to scan them as quickly as possible, then you might want to consider the Epson FastFoto FF-680W. As the name implies, this is a scanner built for speed. It can be loaded with 36 photos at a time for batch scanning and can manage a photo a second at 300dpi. 

That resolution will be too low for some people's requirements, but it should generally be fine for sharing images online. You can go up to 600dpi if you want to squeeze out a little more detail, sacrificing a bit of that blistering speed. If you don't need the crispest detail and you have boxes upon boxes of negatives taking up space, then the FastFoto FF-680W is a good choice for getting them digitised as quickly as possible. And you can always rescan the best ones at a higher resolution.

A product shot of Canon P-208II, one of the best photo scanners

(Image credit: Canon)

04. Canon P-208II

The best portable photo scanner

Specifications

Scan resolution: 600dpi
Interface: USB
Size: 31.2 x 8.9 x 4cm
Weight: 590g

Reasons to buy

+
Compact and portable
+
Decent results
+
Cheap

Reasons to avoid

-
Wi-Fi not as standard

One issue with a lot of the best photo scanners is their size and weight. They tend to be big, bulky and designed to sit in an office or home studio. They're certainly no good for scanning on-the-go. But the Canon P-20811 is designed specifically with portability in mind. It's marketed towards business travellers who need to scan expenses receipts, business cards or other documents while out visiting clients, but we found it to be suitable for photos as well.

It's small enough to fit in many bags and it's surprisingly capable, with a scan resolution of 600dpi, a 10-sheet capacity and duplex scanning. It connects via USB, but if you want to scan to your phone or tablet, there's an optional Wi-Fi unit available that will allow you to do that wirelessly.

A product shot of Epson Perfection V850 Pro, one of the best photo scanners

(Image credit: Epson)

05. Epson Perfection V850 Pro

The best professional photo scanner

Specifications

Scan resolution: 4800dpi or 6400dpi
Interface: USB
Size: 50.3‎ x 30.8 x 15.2cm
Weight: 6.6kg

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent resolution
+
High dynamic range
+
Ideal for prints and film

Reasons to avoid

-
Big, heavy and expensive

The photo scanners we've recommended so far are all good options for general use depending on your needs but might not stand up to more demanding professional requirements. If you want really high quality, one of the best photo scanners for professionals is the Epson Perfection V850. It can scan up to a huge 4800dpi for general photo scanning, and you can boost it to 6400dpi to scan film negatives and slides. 

It also has dual-lens technology built-in, which automatically selects the best lens to scan with based on the image you're using. Like the cheaper Epson Perfection V600, it features Digital ICE tech for removing dust and scratches from old photos, and it boasts a high dynamic range so that it should perfectly match the tone and colour of every print you feed to it. Of course this all means that it costs several times the price of most of the other photo scanners in our selection, so this is very much an option for professional photographers and the most serious amateurs who need this level of quality.

A product shot of the Canon DR-F120, one of the best photo scanners

(Image credit: Canon)

06. Canon DR-F120

One of the best general photo scanners for Windows users

Specifications

Scan resolution: 600dpi
Interface: USB
Size: 33.5 x 46.9 x 12cm
Weight: 4.6kg

Reasons to buy

+
Versatile
+
Good feeder capacity
+
Duplex scanning

Reasons to avoid

-
Windows-only

If you're a Windows user and you need to scan more than photos alone, the Canon DR-F120 is a great solution. It has a document feeder on the top with a 50-sheet capacity, making it ideal for office work. Underneath that, there's a flatbed scanner that's perfect for photos, so we think this scanner is a perfect jack of all trades. It offers a respectable 600dpi max scanning resolution, although those seeking highly detailed scans for professional work might need better. However, it's a solid all-rounder that'll do a good job and scan up to 20 pages per minute.

Product shot of Canon DR-C225W II, one of the best photo scanners

(Image credit: Canon)

07. Canon DR-C225W II

The best slimline photo scanner for saving space

Specifications

Scan resolution: 600dpi
Interface: USB, Wi-Fi
Size: 15.6 x 22 x 30cm
Weight: 2.7kg

Reasons to buy

+
Compact
+
30-sheet capacity

Reasons to avoid

-
Primarily for documents
-
Windows-only

Running out of desk space? The Canon DR-C225W II slimline document scanner isn't the portable option of the P-208II at number 4, but it is another option that's much smaller than many of the best photo scanners. Its sheet-fed design is probably not that suitable for older, more fragile prints, since it's mainly aimed at scanning A4 documents, but it is a small, slimline scanner with reliable results.

It can hold up to 30 sheets in the feeder, and it'll scan in colour at up to 25 pages per minute (of course it'll take longer than that at higher resolutions). Its Wi-Fi connection means that you don't have to worry about messy cables cluttering up your desk either. Like the DR-F120 above, this is another Windows-only scanner.

Product shot of Xerox XD-COMBO, one of the best photo scanners

(Image credit: Xerox)

08. Xerox XD-COMBO

One of the best photo scanners for Macs

Specifications

Scan resolution: 600dpi
Interface: USB
Size: 40.13 x 33.02 x 13.97cm
Weight: 2.7kg

Reasons to buy

+
Flatbed and sheet feeder
+
Built-in image enhancement
+
Mac-compatible

Reasons to avoid

-
No Wi-Fi

So what about Mac users? Well if you're disappointed that the two last options are Windows-only, don't despair because we think the Xerox XD-COMBO is a fine combination scanner. It also has a sheet feeder on top and a flatbed underneath, making it suitable for most scanning jobs. It will work with Windows as well as Mac, and similar to the Canon DR-F120, it can scan at a resolution of up to 600dpi. It also includes an additional feature for improving visual clarity thanks to the on-board Visioneer Acuity technology.

How should I choose the best photo scanner for me?

What kind of photo scanner you need will depend on the results that you're looking for. If you want to maximise quality and detail, you'll want a device that can scan at a very high resolution. This is measured in dots-per-inch (DPI), and most of the scanners on our list scan at 600dpi, however the two Epson Perfection scanners go up to a massive 6400dpi. 

If you're less concerned with quality but painfully aware that you have a lot of photos to scan, then you might prefer a scanner that will zip through images as quickly as possible. For that, we'd recommend the Epson FastFoto FF-680W. And if neither speed not detail are of utmost importance and you simply need to digitise a few images, there are also budget options like the Plustek ePhoto Z300 at number two on our list. 

There are also more specialised photo scanners available, with dedicated holders for specific film formats, including slides. Whatever your scanning needs, there will be a photo scanner for you.

Is it better to scan or photograph old photos?

You may think that an easy way to digitise old physical photos is simply to take a picture of them using your phone or a digital camera. A smartphone can certainly be more convenient than a scanner as you'll always have it to hand, and some of the best camera phones will do a good enough job for a quick share on social media. However, one of the best photo scanners is a much better solution if you can afford one since the quality of the scan will be much higher, and therefore much more suitable for reprinting or other forms of reproduction.

Does scanning a photo damage it?

As long as you take care when handling old photos, scanning them should cause no damage at all. If the photos have curled and are so old that they are physically fragile, then flattening them for the scanner may cause some cracks or other degradation, but this is unlikely. For extremely old photos, you may want to consult a professional digitising or archiving service, but for the vast majority of photographs, scanning will cause no damage at all.

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Jim McCauley is a writer, performer and cat-wrangler who started writing professionally way back in 1995 on PC Format magazine, and has been covering technology-related subjects ever since, whether it's hardware, software or videogames. A chance call in 2005 led to Jim taking charge of Computer Arts' website and developing an interest in the world of graphic design, and eventually led to a move over to the freshly-launched Creative Bloq in 2012. Jim now works as a freelance writer for sites including Creative Bloq, T3 and PetsRadar, specialising in design, technology, wellness and cats, while doing the occasional pantomime and street performance in Bath and designing posters for a local drama group on the side.

With contributions from